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What Are the Most Frequently Asked Questions About Child Support in Florida?

At the Law Office of Denise Miller, our Stuart family law attorney understands that when children are at the center of your divorce, their well-being is everyone’s priority.

Their health, education, and personal growth often begin with financial stability, including how child support decisions, payments, and settlements are determined in Florida.

To follow are some of the most common questions our attorney receives about child support in Florida.

It is important to understand that the details of your divorce and child custody arrangements will dictate how child support is determined for each family’s unique circumstances.

If you have questions about child support, we will help provide specific solutions that will present clarity for your family.

How Are Child Support Payments Determined In Florida?

Florida child support calculations are determined by the:

  • Net incomes of both parents
  • Number of children
  • Timeshare/custody agreement

What Is Considered Net Income For Florida Child Support Calculations?

Each parent’s net income will be determined by their income from all sources minus any applicable deductions, which can include but are not limited to insurance premiums, court-ordered child support payments from previous relationships, and tax obligations.

Income sources can include:

  • Cash flow from businesses
  • Employment income or salaries
  • Investment income
  • Recurring interest income

The Florida courts will also review the financial responsibility each parent is allocated while emphasizing the importance of both parents’ inclusion in the children’s day to day lives. These decisions will directly affect the amount of child support you are ordered to pay or receive.

Is There a Cap on Florida Child Support Payments?

Technically, no.

There is no maximum amount of child support in Florida since it is based primarily on the number of children and both of their parents’ incomes. Those figures will differ for each family.

How Long Do Child Support Payments Last In Florida?

In the State of Florida, child support payments are scheduled to end when the child turns 18, unless:

  • The child has not graduated from high school after turning 18 but before turning 19, then the support ends at graduation.
  • The child graduates after turning 19, then support ends on his or her 19th birthday.

Florida allows child support to continue beyond age 19 when a child has special needs — including mental or physical incapacitation — that renders them dependent for a specified period or indefinitely.

What If My Florida Child Support Is Not Being Used For The Children?

Florida child support payments are designed to cover the children’s basic needs, including clothing, shelter, and food. It may also cover expenses related to the child’s education, sports, activities, travel, and entertainment.

While the parent who is charged with paying the support may feel as though the support is being misused, the payments can be used for many things that indirectly or directly relate to the children. The recipient does not have to provide receipts or explanations for those expenses.

Can Florida Child Support Orders Be Modified?

Yes.

Child support can be modified in Florida when there is a change to:

  • The paying parent’s financial circumstances
  • The children’s financial needs
  • The custody arrangement that extends or lessens the timeshare agreement the child support was initially based on

If you have questions about pursuing child support during your divorce proceedings or if you currently have an agreement that you would like modified, contact our Martin County and Stuart family law attorney at the Law Office of Denise Miller today by calling 772-934-6007 to discuss your case during a free consultation.

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